Daniel Burrus Innovation Guru

Daniel Burrus is considered one of the world’s leading futurists on global trends and innovation. The New York Times has referred to him as one of the top three business gurus in the highest demand as a speaker. He is a strategic advisor to executives from Fortune 500 companies, helping them to accelerate innovation and results by develop game-changing strategies based on his proven methodologies for capitalizing on technology innovations and their future impact. His client list includes companies such as Microsoft, GE, American Express, Google, Deloitte, Procter & Gamble, Honda, and IBM. He is the author of seven books, including The New York Times and Wall Street Journal best-seller Flash Foresight, and his latest book The Anticipatory Organization. He is a featured writer with millions of monthly readers on the topics of innovation, change and the future and has appeared in Harvard Business Review, Wired, CNBC, and Huffington Post to name a few. He has been the featured subject of several PBS television specials and has appeared on programs such as CNN, Fox Business, and Bloomberg, and is quoted in a variety of publications, including The Wall Street Journal, Financial Times, Fortune, and Forbes. He has founded six businesses, four of which were national leaders in the United States in the first year. He is the CEO of Burrus Research, a research and consulting firm that monitors global advancements in technology driven trends to help clients profit from technological, social and business forces that are converging to create enormous, untapped opportunities. In 1983 he became the first and only futurist to accurately identify the twenty technologies that would become the driving force of business and economic change for decades to come. He also linked exponential computing advances to economic value creation. His specialties are technology-driven trends, strategic innovation, strategic advising and planning, business keynote presentations.

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Why Information Is No Longer Enough

Take a moment and think about a recent conversation you had that was rewarding and useful. You likely had a lot to say, as did everyone else involved. There was a lot of back and forth as everyone took their time to express their opinions while giving others the chance to share their insights.

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The Power of Anticipatory Customer Service

The common view of customer service is one focused on reaction. A customer buys something, has a problem, issue or question—either during the sales process itself or later on—which is then handled by a customer service professional.

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Artificial Intelligence: A Question of Data

Business people, not to mention the public on a global basis, are getting increasingly excited, as well as concerned, about the potential of artificial intelligence (A.I.)—so much so that China’s growing involvement in A.I., and the vast quantity of data that China is capable of generating on a daily basis, has many wondering if the U.S. will be a leader or follower in this important technology category as the future unfolds.

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The Essentials of Anticipatory Sales

Everyone is accustomed to the traditional dynamic of selling. A customer desires something and, from there, someone else sells them a product or service to address that desire. Great salespeople convert a want into a need. 

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Hard Trends Are Easy to Find If You Know Where to Look

A well-worn cliché says there are only two things you can be certain about: death and taxes. With apologies to those who agree with that statement, there are many, many more examples of out-and-out certainties.

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The Disrupted or the Disruptor: Pick One

What comes to mind when you hear the term “disrupt”? Does it suggest chaos, lack of direction or other unsettling events?

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Digital Disruption: Not Just for Millennials Anymore 

Being anticipatory can mean many things. In some cases, it’s about identifying opportunities for major disruptions that you yourself can introduce (think Uber, Kickstarter and other ideas that set entire industries on their ear).

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The Future of Self-Driving Vehicles

Several recent news articles illustrate why my predictions for autonomous vehicles have been correct so far and will continue to be accurate — namely, that “the future of self-driving vehicles will be to use semi-autonomous vehicle technology to lower and/or eliminate accidents, not to eliminate the driver on public roads.”

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Innovation: Everyone’s Responsibility

Ask anyone in your organization to outline their responsibilities, and you’ll generally get the usual list—sales, marketing, employee benefits and other similar tasks.

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Digital Disruption and Your Workforce

Being anticipatory can mean many things. In some cases, it’s about identifying opportunities for major disruptions that you yourself can introduce (think Uber, Kickstarter and other innovations that set entire industries on their ear).

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