David Katz Science Guru

David L. Katz, MD, MPH, FACPM, FACP, FACLM, is the Founding Director (1998) of Yale University’s Yale-Griffin Prevention Research Center, and current President of the American College of Lifestyle Medicine. He has published roughly 200 scientific articles and textbook chapters, and 15 books to date, including multiple editions of leading textbooks in both preventive medicine, and nutrition. He has made important contributions in the areas of lifestyle interventions for health promotion; nutrient profiling; behavior modification; holistic care; and evidence-based medicine. David earned his BA degree from Dartmouth College (1984); his MD from the Albert Einstein College of Medicine (1988); and his MPH from the Yale University School of Public Health (1993). He completed sequential residency training in Internal Medicine, and Preventive Medicine/Public Health. He is a two-time diplomate of the American Board of Internal Medicine, and a board-certified specialist in Preventive Medicine/Public Health. He has received two Honorary Doctorates.

 

DNA Is Not Destiny? Well, Duh

A high profile paper previously published in the highly prestigious journal, Nature, suggests that overwhelmingly, cancer results from “extrinsic factors,” namely behaviors and exposures, rather than the “intrinsic” transgressions of our chromosomes. The media response is a proclamation that no, cancer is not just about “bad luck.” So august a platform for so salient a proposition seems to demand a highly erudite response, and I’ve got just the one: duh.

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Diet and the Art of Denying the Obvious

Scarcely a week goes by these days without hearing yet again from some perch of lofty intellectual reflection that we know nothing about the basic feeding of Homo sapiens. We are told our research is flawed, our assessments useless, and thus our knowledge permanently something near to nil.

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Carbs, Calories, Weight, and Diet Quality: What A New Study Really Means

A fascinating and well-run randomized trial of 164 adults just published in the BMJindicating that eating a low-carbohydrate diet for maintenance of weight loss can increase energy expenditure has predictably generated widespread media attention. Some of the highest-profile entries in that barrage of brief attention, notably coverage in The Chicago Tribune and in The New York Times, massively misrepresent the study findings.

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Diet Guidance in America: Of, By, and For What People?

Before turning attention directly to the Dietary Guidelines, let’s conduct a thought experiment. Imagine that a major auto manufacturer, pick anyone you like, has its best engineers draw up detailed blueprints for the new lineup of cars. Imagine these blueprints begin with the prior lineup of cars, but then use the best, current engineering and technology to improve on them.

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Public Health and Citizens, Truly United

There are just two problems with the prevailing conception of “public health”- the public, and health. Neither means what we think it means.

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