More in Global Economy


7 months

Some Peculiarities of Labor Markets: Is Antitrust an Answer?

Labor markets are in some ways fundamentally different from markets for goods and services. A job is a relationship, but in general, the worker needs the relationship to begin and to last more than the employer does/ John Bates Clark , probably the most eminent American economist of his time, put it this way in his 1907 book, Essentials of Economic Theory.

7 months

Capital Flows – Is a Reckoning Nigh?

·        Borrowing in Euros continues to rise even as the rate of US borrowing slows

7 months

Why Economists Usually Oppose New Light Rail and Subways

When it comes to urban mass transit, economists often find themselves arguing that, the ratio of benefits to costs in most is far better for buses than for rail-based system--unless there is a densely populated urban core where nearly-full trains can run a very frequent intervals. Matthew Turner explains why in "Local Transportation Policy and Economic Opportunity," written for the Hamilton Project at the Brookings Institution (January 31, 2019).

8 months

Economics of Daylight Savings Time

Where I live in Minnesota, the short days of December have less than 9 hours of daylight, with sunrise around 7:50 am and sunset around 4:40 pm. In contrast, the long days of June have about 15 1/2 hours of daylight, with sunrise around 5:30 am and sunset around 9:00 pm. But of course, those summer times for sunrise and sunset use Daylight Savings Time. If we didn't spring the clocks forward in March, the summertime in Minnesota would feature a 4:30 am sunrise and an 8:00 sundown.

8 months

Some Economic Consequences of the Near-Extinction of the Buffalo

The American buffalo population declined gradually through much of the 19th century; for example, they were almost entirely gone from the area east of the Mississippi River by the 1830s. But the near-extinction of the buffalo happened in a rush of about a decade, with a decline from 10-15 million in the early 1870s to only a few hundred by the late 1880s. Economic research from a few years ago suggests that the driving force was an 1872 innovation in tanning technology which happened in Europe, and an associated strong demand in Europe for buffalo hides. The 19th century buffalo herds were endangered by many factors, but it was pressure from globalization that drove them to near-extinction.

8 months

Warning Signs of US Corporate Debt

Comparing the recession of 2001 and the recession of 2007-2009 reminded economists of an old lesson: A crash of asset prices in the stock market or housing can be a nasty hit for an economy, but when problems arise where many debts aren't going to be repaid in full or on time, the shock to the financial system and the economy can be much worse. For example, one study of the Great Recession found that about one-quarter or one-third of the decline in output was because of the fall in housing prices, while about two-thirds or three-quarters of the decline was related to how problems related to excessive debt worked their way through the financial system.

8 months

Back To Fundamentals

If we look at the list of key macroeconomic data published in recent weeks, we can not use a better definition than “disappointing”.