More in Global Economy


5 months

The Right and Wrong Kind of Artificial Intelligence for Labor Markets

Sometimes technology replaces existing jobs. Sometimes it create new jobs. Sometimes it does both at the same time. This raises an intriguing question: Do we need to view the effects of technology on jobs as a sort of tornado blowing through the labor market? Or could we come to understand why some technologies have bigger effects on creating jobs, or supplementing existing jobs, than on replacing job--and maybe even give greater encouragement to those kinds of technologies?

5 months

Gold – Is It All that Glisters?

Uncertainty about US trade policy has truncated the rally in stocks Gold remains supported by central bank buying and fears of a US$ collapse Gold miners look best placed to reap the benefits regardless of direction A collapse in the U$ is needed for gold to rally substantially In Q4 2018, as stocks declined, gold rallied 8.1% and gold mining stocks 13.7%. It was a prescient reminder of the value of gold as a portfolio diversifier. There have, however, been some other developments both for gold and gold mining stocks which are worthy of closer investigation.

5 months

US-China: Much More Than A Trade War

In these weeks we have read a lot about the so-called trade war. However, this is better described as a negotiation between the largest consumer and the largest supplier with important political and even moral ramifications. This is also a dispute between two economic models.

5 months

Where Will America Find Caregivers as its Elderly Population Rises?

As we look ahead two or three decades into the future, we know several demographic facts with an extremely high degree of confidence. We know that that the number of elderly people in the population will be rising, and as a result, the demand for long-term care services will rise substantially. We also know that the birthrate has been falling, and so this generation of the eventually-will-be-elderly has had fewer children than the previous generation.

5 months

Interview with William “Sandy” Darity Jr.: Inequality, Race, Stratification, and More

Douglas Clement interviews William "Sandy" Darity Jr. in The Region magazine from the Federal Reserve Bank of Minneapolis (June 3, 2019). As the subtitle reads: "His recent focus has been on reparations for African Americans, but his scholarship spans decades and ranges from imperialism to psychology, from “price-specie flow” to rational expectations." Here are a few points that caught my eye, but the entire interview is worth reading.

5 months

The Global Paper Industry: Still on the Rise

Paper is an old industry, dating back to 100 BC in China. For several decades now, there have been predictions that paper would decline, as businesses converted to the "paperless office" and as people moved to reading online rather than on dead tree. How is that transition going? The short answer is "only OK." For a longer answer, the Environmental Paper Network offers a review in The State of the Global Paper Industry, subtitled "Shifting Seas: New Challenges and Opportunities for Forests, People and the Climate" (April 2018).

6 months

Pareidolia: When Correlations are Truly Meaningless

"Pareidolia" refers to the common human practice of looking at random outcomes but trying to impose patterns on them. For example, we all know in the logical part of our brain that there are a roughly a kajillion different variables in the world, and so if we look through the possibilities, we will will have a 100% chance of finding some variables that are highly correlated with each other. These correlations will be a matter of pure chance, and they carry no meaning. But when my own brain, and perhaps yours, sees one of these correlations, I can feel my thoughts start searching for a story to explain what looks to my eyes like a connected pattern.