Jesse Martin Society Guru

Jesse is #8 LinkedIn Global Top Voice 2017 - Education. He is a world leader in the integration of the science of learning into formal teaching settings. He is an Adjunct Associate Professor at the University of Lethbridge and Director at The Academy for the Scholarship of Learning. Huge advocate of the science of learning, he provides people with ideas about how they can use it in their classrooms. Jesse holds a PhD in Psychology from the University of Wales, Bangor.

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Science of Learning: Complex Inductive Reasoning

The difference between inductive and deductive reasoning is that they are really what you could think of as opposites. Deductive reasoning is going through the process of reasoning in order to understand the world from a general idea to the specifics of how that general idea works in particular instances. 

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Science of Learning: Deductive Reasoning

Deductive reasoning is not a natural way to think and must be learned. As a higher order thinking skill, the cognitive functioning necessary to engage in deductive reasoning develops during adolescence. However, deductive reasoning is difficult to carry out, and normally becomes evident only after formal instruction in deductive reasoning.

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Academia: Can We Save Ourselves from Ourselves?

When did education stop being about learning and turn into a performance art? I was reading over some of my students’ work from a couple of years ago, and one of the things that jumped out at me was their collective observation that education was about grades, degrees, and getting ahead and not about learning (they weren’t happy about it – often pointing out that this is wrong - education should be about learning).

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Suing the Professor

After careful consideration, looking at malpractice in medicine, and recent serious queries from students about the subject, my thinking about educational malpractice has changed in the past week. Let me tell you where I have come to.

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Harnessing our Problem Solving Abilities

Critical thinking is the most powerful problem-solving tool in existence. Not the kind of problem that can be coded with an algorithm, but a complex problem that involves thinking. How do we develop the skill of critical thinking? Critical thinking is not a single skill but a collection of skills that allow someone to figure out a difficult, complex problem.

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The Reinforcement of Understanding

In a world awash with information, people have become more and more ignorant. Information is ubiquitous and is available to almost everyone in the developed world. Information is a powerful tool. The control of the information abundant society we now live in has created some of the largest and most powerful corporations the world has ever seen.

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Learning from Mistakes

If you have heard the phrase that “we learn from our mistakes” you may wonder why mistakes are unacceptable in schools. The very places that we go to learn.

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What's Wrong with Universities?

We know that the vast majority of students go into higher education to get a qualification. But there are other reasons as well that have nothing to do with learning.

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Educational Malpractice

Educational institutions have long been shielded from malpractice suits because courts have been reluctant to hear cases for a number of reasons. The original ruling that this is based on was made almost 50 years ago, and much has changed in both education and litigation.

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Different Ways of Learning

As I work to disseminate and teach the principles of The Science of Learning, I find myself continually faced with the statement “yes, but everyone learns differently.” I know that this is one of the foundational stones of the current educational world, but where is the evidence for this?

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