Jesse Martin Society Guru

Jesse is #8 LinkedIn Global Top Voice 2017 - Education. He is a world leader in the integration of the science of learning into formal teaching settings. He is an Adjunct Associate Professor at the University of Lethbridge and Director at The Academy for the Scholarship of Learning. Huge advocate of the science of learning, he provides people with ideas about how they can use it in their classrooms. Jesse holds a PhD in Psychology from the University of Wales, Bangor.

 

Science of Learning: Flexibility and Lecturing

I have written several articles about thinking and the evidence showing a lack of thinking in our students when they graduate. I have also written a few articles about lecturing, one of the most dearly held belief systems in higher education. I will use the example of our beliefs in lecturing to talk about developing the higher order thinking skill of flexibility or open-mindedness.

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Continuous Learning and Social Herding

We are in a time when continuous learning is becoming the accepted norm in life. We no longer get some schooling, find a job, and then work there until retirement. There are too many changes in the workplace and society for us to simply park after learning. We must constantly learn in order to maintain value in our occupation and in society in general.

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Science of Learning: Persistence and Activation

Persistence is sticking with something, but activation is starting something. In thinking, both are important. If we don’t start thinking (activation) we can’t persist with thinking, and there is no thinking at all.

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Why The Science of Learning?

The Science of Learning is a blend of scientific knowledge. There is a wealth of scientific knowledge that has been accumulated about how people learn. The knowledge is spread across a number of disciplines and is brought together under the umbrella term The Science of Learning. The Science of Learning is the application of this body of scientific knowledge to formal teaching.

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Science of Learning: Planning our Thinking

Engaging in higher order thinking is not a random process. One of the hallmarks of higher order thinking is that the thinking is directed toward accomplishing something. In order to direct our thinking, we must plan so that we have a direction to go.

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