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3 months

A Physician’s Tribute to her Father

Sometimes it is a light breeze across my face, sometimes it is a flutter in my heart, sometimes it is a glimmer of a memory, and momentarily, you are with me dad. The sensation never lasts long, just a flash sometimes as I’m talking to a patient or writing notes in a chart, and as soon as I recognize it, you are gone. But in that moment, it is like you are tapping me on the shoulder and saying “stop, take a breath, remember.” And so I remember moments, like a still picture in a slideshow.

3 months

Misremembering What Makes Us Fat

There is a particular irony in marking the occasion of Memorial Day by misremembering history. TIME Magazine’s cover story about why diets fail so many of us, and why so many of us are fat, is thus almost as ironic as it is interesting. The article apparently misremembers, and all but fails to mention, the most fundamental, influential, and flagrant of explanations for our obesity problem. But we’ll come back to that.

3 months

The Pomp and Circumstance of Blood

I was sitting in a chair next to my son wondering if he was going to die. He was sound asleep, so I flipped through my emails on my Apple laptop that was now covered with stickers I had taken from the pediatric cancer nurses station. Superman, Despicable Me, SpongeBob, Cancer Sucks, NY Yankees ... all the edges on the stickers were starting to wear a bit.

3 months

How was the Entrepreneurship Conference, Doctor?

So now that biomedical and clinical innovation and entrepreneurship are on the lips of seemingly anyone who has anything to do with sick care, we are seeing lots of seminars, conferences and workshops on the subjects. The latest twist is to get clinicians, entrepreneurs, investors and techies in the same room in an effort to get them to play nice together.

3 months

Do We Dare to Eat Lectins?

In The Love Song of J. Alfred Prufrock, T.S. Eliot’s protagonist asks, chewing on mortality and the pangs of senescence, if he dares to eat a peach. We can all thank Dr. Steven Gundry for upping the ante, and asking if any of us dares to eat chickpeas or eggplant; apples or oats; beans or lentils; or for that matter, almost any fruit, many vegetables, and most beans, legumes, grains, and certain nuts. His answer is: no. His reason is: lectins.

3 months

Anaplasmosis to Zika: Good luck out there!

The CDC issued a report this past week highlighting dramatic increases in the rates of infectious diseases spread by ticks, fleas, and mosquitoes- otherwise known as “vector-borne diseases.” That list includes some long-familiar scourges, such as Lyme disease; some rather new to our lexicon in this part of the world, like Zika; some seemingly resurrected from Medieval parchment, like plague; and some long considered someone else’s problem, like dengue.

3 months

Recent Advances in the Diagnosis and Treatment of Neophilia

The conventional wisdom is that the sick care, higher education and government establishments are resistant to change. Not true, says theoretical physicist, Leonard Mlodinow, who believes human beings have the unique ability to think flexibly in ways that would unleash an inherent creativity — a skill he calls elastic thinking. In fact, says Mlodinow, human resist negative change but embrace positive change. He claims we are all neophiliacs by nature.