Jesse Martin Higher Education Expert

Jesse is a world leader in the integration of the science of learning into formal teaching settings. He is an Adjunct Associate Professor at the University of Lethbridge and Director at The Academy for the Scholarship of Learning. Huge advocate of the science of learning, he provides people with ideas about how they can use it in their classrooms. Jesse holds a PhD in Psychology from the University of Wales, Bangor.

 

People and the 4th Industrial Revolution

There is no doubt that the prosperous workers of the future will have to demonstrate agility in learning. Learning will be a continuous process for anyone who wants to remain valuable as the world changes. So, what is the catch? We all move smoothly out of and into stages of learning and working as smoothly as we move out of shallow sleep to deep sleep. But there is a catch. In fact, there are two catches. People and corporate culture. Neither of these are going to change quickly or anytime soon, and so the transition for those moving from the learning->work culture of the past will be faced with obstacles that we will have to navigate now and in the foreseeable future.

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Science of Learning: Testing Effect

The testing effect is all about memory. If you need to have information memorized, the testing effect is said to be your most powerful tool.

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Science of Learning: The Spacing Effect

The spacing effect is a desirable difficulty for learning (along with the testing effect) that helps produce long lasting, durable memory traces, but has also been ignored in education. The spacing effect is when the learning of material takes place over long periods of time. Usually, when we teach something, we concentrate the presentation of related information in a short amount of time. Once that information is learned, we move on to different information. Longer lasting and more durable memory traces result from the spacing of the learning of information in time.

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Neuroanthropology and Education

This piece presents a very different view of education. Contributed to my current class by Aaron Chubb (one of my students) this week as a part of my class. I thought that it was really interesting.

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Science of Learning: Disfluency Effect

Among the desirable difficulties that can be introduced into a classroom to enhance memorization, disfluency stands out as being particularly unintuitive. Disfluency is the process of making items to be learned more difficult to process which means that the student, in using more processing, processes the material to a deeper level. This is usually done by introducing interference during the encoding stage of learning, making the process more difficult, and leading to additional processing right from the start aiding in remembering the material.

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