Paul Sloane Innovation Expert

Paul is a professional keynote conference speaker and expert facilitator on innovation and lateral thinking. He helps companies improve idea generation and creative leadership. His workshops transform innovation leadership skills and generate great ideas for business issues. His recent clients include Airbus, Microsoft, Unilever, Nike, Novartis and Swarovski. He has published 30 books on lateral thinking puzzles, innovation, leadership and problem solving (with over 2 million copies sold). He also acts as link presenter at conferences and facilitator at high level meetings such as a corporate advisory board. He has acted as host or MC at Awards Dinners. Previously, he was CEO of Monactive, VP International of MathSoft and UK MD of Ashton-Tate. He recently launched a series of podcast interviews entitled Insights from Successful People.

 
What Every Chief Innovation Officer Should Know

What Every Chief Innovation Officer Should Know

I was pleased and proud to be appointed to the position of CIO (Chief Innovation Officer). 

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15 Things Leaders Should Not Do

15 Things Leaders Should Not Do

We hear plenty of advice for leaders on what they should do to drive entrepreneurship and innovation in their organizations. 

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Hire Great People and then Empower Them

Talking about his film, ‘To Rome with Love’, Woody Allen said, ‘I’ve got great people, and they make me look good. 

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How Often Do Doctors Misdiagnose?

We tend to revere our clinicians as towering experts in their fields. So how often do you think doctors misdiagnose? How often might your doctor tell you that you have some illness or condition, but it's not right? For example, a doctor might diagnose the flu, but the patient really has something much more serious - like Lyme Disease.

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Find the Root Cause of the Problem & Fix It

In August 1854, there was a deadly outbreak of cholera in the Soho district of central London. Cholera leads to diarrhoea, vomiting, dehydration, and in many cases to death. Thousands of people fell ill and over 600 died.

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