More in Global Economy


3 months

Interview with Maureen Cropper: Environmental Economics

Catherine L. Kling and Fran Sussman have "A Conversation with Maureen Cropper" in the Annual Review of Resource Economics (October 2019, 11, pp. 1-18). As they write in the introduction: Maureen has made important contributions to several areas of environmental economics, including non-market valuation and the evaluation of environmental programs. She has also conducted pioneering studies on household transportation use and associated externalities." There also is a short (~ a dozen paragraphs) overview of some of Cropper's best-known work, I had not know that Cropper identified as a monetary economist when she was headed for graduate school. Here is her description of her early path to environmental economics:

3 months

The Hearing Aid Example: Why Technology Doesn't Reduce Trade

Will the new technologies of 3D printing and robotics lead to a reduction in international trade? After all, if countries can use 3D printing and robotics to make goods at home, why import from abroad?

3 months

Remembering the Cadillac Tax

When employers pay the health insurance premiums for their employees, these payments are exempt from income tax. If health insurance payments by employers were taxed as income, the government would collect about $200 billion in additional income taxes, and another $130 billion in payroll taxes for supporting Social Security and Medicare (according to the Analytical Perspectives volume of the US budget for 2020, Table 16-1).

3 months

A US-China Trade Deal Will Likely Be A Zero-Sum Game

As I explained on CNBC: Even the most optimistic assumptions are unlikely to change the trend of weak global growth.

3 months

The Health Costs of Global Air Pollution

The State of Global Air 2019 report notes:

3 months

Interview with Emmanuel Farhi: Global Safe Assets and Macro as Aggregated Micro

David A. Price interviews Emmanuel Farhi in Econ Focus (Regional Federal Reserve Bank of Richmond, Second/Third Quarter 2019, pp. 18-23). Here are some tidbits:

3 months

Fentanyl and Synthetic Opioids: What's Happening, What's Next?

The US had 50,000 opioid-involved overdose deaths in 2019. This is similar to the number of people who died of AIDS at the peak of that crisis in 1995. For comparison, total deaths in car crashes is about 40,000 per year. My dark suspicion is that the opioid crisis gets less national media attention because its worse effects are concentrated in parts of Appalachia, New England, and certain mid-Atlantic states, rather than in big coastal cities.